Book 1 in the Motorcycle Book Series

Motorcycle Smarts: Overcome Fear, Learn Control, Master Riding Well

"If I didn't think I could measurably reduce my chances of crashing, I wouldn't ride."  — David Mixson

Do you feel guilty for wanting to ride a motorcycle? Do you have a fear that overcomes you when you ride? Do you want to enjoy the peace of mind knowing that you're doing everything possible NOT to leave your family alone?

David Mixson, author of the Motorcycle Smarts book series (and NASA engineer), debunks the myth that crashing is a matter of fate by explaining the most important topics that other motorcycle mega books gloss over.

You won't find page-filling discussions about how to get the most out of your first Sturgis Rally or how to select riding gear. Instead, you'll find one of the most in-depth, simple to understand explanations of lowside and highside crashes that exists—anywhere. Riders die every day in these rider-induced crashes—and it doesn't have to be this way.

Mastering the art of riding a motorcycle well is about understanding and overcoming rider fear. It's about having the head knowledge of how your motorcycle works so you can make it go where you want it to go. It's about understanding why riders crash so you can avoid making the same mistakes. It's about taking ownership of your riding safety.

In addition to in-depth discussions about rider fear and (lowside and highside crashes), Motorcycle Smarts covers topics like countersteering, muscle memory, and braking. It also addresses some of the most important lessons from the Hurt Report and makes a case for only riding motorcycles equipped with ABS—that has nothing to do with stopping distances.

Here's what one reader said:
"I've read Total Control, Proficient Motorcycling, and Stayin Safe, but the section in Motorcycle Smarts on lowside and highside crashes is all the difference. David is great at simplifying difficult concepts. I'm definitely passing along this book to my riding friends."
— Dano in San Diego, California

NHTSA studies show that nearly half of all motorcycle fatalities are caused by rider error—and the numbers aren't getting any better. The training isn't working. The current motorcycle skills books aren't working. We need a fresh approach to helping riders NOT crash. This book is that.

"This is the book I would hand to someone who's been riding for decades and wants to reduce their risk of crashing. This is the book I would give my son or daughter if they told me they wanted to learn how to ride a motorcycle. This is the book I couldn't find when I first started riding at forty."
— David Mixson